Education Resources

Local, regional and national education information

ADVOCACY SITES

NATIONAL/INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION & SCHOOL SITES

REGIONAL/STATE EDUCATION & SCHOOL SITES

PATTAN offers free guides/publications available for download

At PaTTAN, our goal is to provide educators with a breadth of publications that are grounded in proven best practices and a deep research base, reflecting a commitment to school improvement. PaTTAN offers publications on a variety of topics, all focused on improving educational results for students with and without disabilities.

Whether you are just starting out in the field of education, or you want to improve upon the work you and your team are already doing, let PaTTAN support you with the expertise of our educational consultants. Pennsylvania educators, school administrators, and families can view, download, and order PaTTAN publications mailed to their school or home.

EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR LINKS

RIGHT TO EDUCATION TASK FORCES

State and Local Task Forces include parents and professionals who can offer assistance to families with questions about services for students with special needs. The Task Forces exist to help families and school districts work together to ensure the integrity and delivery of special education services to eligible students.

Connect Information Service: 1-800-692-7288

A statewide, telephone helpline provides parents, educators and professionals with information on early intervention, special education, child development and family/social concerns.

Special Education Consult Line: 1-800-879-2301

A service of the PDE; help for families and advocates of children with special needs about school-related concerns, special education regulations, and the complaint system.

OAR’s Kit for Kids Peer Education Resource

The Organization for Autism Research (OAR) recently made two additions to its popular autism resources. The Kit for Kids set of student activity workbooks and an animated web video is designed to teach elementary and middle school students about their peers with autism. It is centered around an illustrated, booklet called, “What’s up with Nick?” and a three-minute web video that uses cartoon animation, sound, and color to capture children’s attention, yet still offers accurate autism information using language they can understand. It’s a great way to start a classroom dialogue about autism and accepting differences.